Why You Need To Pick Up After Your Pooch

Picking up after your pet is one of the many responsibilities we assume when deciding to become a full-fledged pet owner. Sure, it’s arguably the worst part of owning a pet and many of us have fallen guilty to simply leaving it behind once or twice. I mean, what’s the harm in that, right? Doesn’t waste just decompose? Well, it’s actually a bit more complicated than that.

Why You Need To Pick Up After Your Pooch

Yes, we know pet waste is ugly, smelly, and plain gross, but the potential health risks unattended waste presents far outweighs the “icky factor”.  Surely every dog owner out there has turned a blind eye or two, but next time your four-legged companion answers nature’s call, consider the following facts.

There Are Diseases in Waste!

As you more than likely know, pet waste contains harmful diseases and viruses that can pose great threats to young children, puppies, and other animals. As a hotbed for cell production, pet feces can host a number of concerning threats like Salmonella, Coronavirus, Roundworms, and Hookworms. Nasty intestinal parasites like Giardia can also be easily spread through contact with fecal matter.

And don’t think that just because you stay away from public parks, this can’t affect you. Even if your pooch does their business in your own backyard, undisposed waste can still harm children and other dogs. Hookworm eggs tend to get deposited through fecal waste, and the larvae can puncture through the skin on the bottom of your feet.

Young, unvaccinated puppies are also at great risk of catching parvovirus, a germ often found in pet waste. Infected dogs have been known to “shed” the virus through defecation long after their supposedly cured, which means the next pup that comes along is in potential danger.

Beware of Rainfall

Perhaps even more concerning is how leftover pet waste …

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How to Help Pet Stores Sell Healthier Animals

A few weeks ago, a close friend and I were talking about people ‘rescuing’ neglected animals from pet stores. I told him that I don’t do this nor do I support this practice. His expression told me that I needed to explain my reasons. This is a resulting of our conversation that day and I hope this influences any other peoples’ opinions of rescuing neglected pet store animals.

I related the following- At our online business, we sell many animals. I get a LOT of Emails. Some are inquiries about purchasing animals, some are questions on caring for animals, some are Emails showing off animals purchased some time before. These are always fun Emails to answer. A few however are more difficult to answer but I feel the issue presented must be covered. The E-mail goes one thing like this- “I stopped in at ‘insert your neighborhood pet store name here’ and discovered ‘insert reptile name here’. The animal was going to die and I couldn’t leave it there so I purchased it! How do I care for this animal now?” I always respond with suggestions on care for the animal but follow up with this statement- “Please do not purchase weak/sick/dying animals from this store again!”

We are fortunate in this area (Milwaukee) to have several great pet stores that really know what they are doing. But, we have some that do not know how to care for reptiles. When customers purchase sick animals from stores, that indicates to the owners that they should restock those animals! When buying a sick/dying animal, you are not only jeopardizing your own animals (passing on the sickness) but also encouraging the store to bring in more! Do not purchase these animals. I do not however support boycotts or on-line protests against these …

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Are Pet Store Turtles a Ripoff?

Critical turtle enthusiasts insist that you simply need to in no way obtain a pet retailer turtle. Then they will proceed to let you know horror stories of pet store turtles that died inside months of acquire and looked sickly since day one particular. These persons would advocate that you just only look at a pet turtle from a breeder or possibly a turtle farm.

Some of these claims of less than perfect pet stores are absolutely true, but that does not mean you have to go to a breeder to find a good pet. You can find a great pet turtle anywhere as long as you know what you are looking for.

Pet stores are no different than breeders, some are good and some are not so good. Theoretically a breeder would have the very best specimen of turtle with the best health and life expectancy.

Unfortunately, this is only true if it is a good breeder you are dealing with. If the breeder puts in the effort and does what is necessary this would be true. Unfortunately the title breeder alone does not ensure quality pets.

When looking at turtles in the pet store you should go over a small check list of things to look out for. You want a healthy turtle with a strong chance at a long life. Before you decide to purchase a turtle you should insist on looking at every part of its body.

Ask someone to get it for you! Do not reach in and grab it yourself. They hate it when you try to reach in tanks and cages. This is simply to protect the animals.

Inspect the Body

Check all over the turtles shell for cracks or week spots. Little dents can be fine, but cracks or soft spots indicate …

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