• Making Decisions Through Grief: What to Remember When Your Pet Passes Away
    Pet Care

    Making Decisions Through Grief: What to Remember When Your Pet Passes Away

    You’ve connected with your pet since they were a furry baby, or the second you saw them at the pound or in your neighbor’s yard. You’ve fed, groomed, snuggled, and loved them every step of the way. In return, they loved you back unconditionally. They watched out for you and the rest of the family, provided endless entertainment, exercise, and a sense of home. The years have gone by too quickly, and you may have learned they have a sickness from which they’ll never recover, or you recognize that their time is near its end. You decide to do them one last act of kindness and not let them suffer. Or perhaps they left on their own schedule. Now you have to decide how best to memorialize them while going through a specific kind grief.

    The first thing to remember in this moment is that whatever you’re feeling is normal. Society as a whole doesn’t do well with grief. Add in the fact that some people don’t understand the deep sadness that can overtake a person who has lost a pet, and it can make the feelings that much harder to work through. Take your time saying goodbye, and be kind to yourself while doing so. Will the idea of burying them yourself seem too daunting a task to tackle? Are you unsure of the process of cremation and need to ask a few questions? Keep these points in mind during this important decision-making process.

    The cremation options

    Cremation has its roots in the early stone age and is still popular today because of its affordable pricing and relative ease. While human cremation has its own set of rules and regulations, pet cremation is a bit different. You’ll need to specify if you’re okay with your pet being cremated with others, as in a partitioned cremation where bodies are separated but go into the oven at the same time, or communal cremation where they’re mingled together. For an additional fee, you’ll also have the option of having a private cremation.

    Once they’ve gone through the cremation process, you’ll receive their ashes and pulverized bone fragments back in a box, generally with a certificate from the company that provided this service. Some also offer paw prints in plaster or locks of their hair for you to keep.

    Alternatives to traditional cremation

    Alkaline hydrolysis is a newer process that uses water in place of fire during a “green cremation.” The body is put into a chamber that is to be filled with 300 degree water and a solution to break down tissue, hair, and other components. After a few hours, the fluid is drained from the steel chamber, leaving behind soft bone fragments. These are then pulverized and given back to you. Alkaline hydrolysis reduces harmful pollution that can be released into the air during traditional cremation, while still being as cost effective as traditional options. This is available through specialized companies like VIP Aquamation, so be sure to ask … Read More

  • Top Five of the Best Dog Kennels for Breeders
    Pet Dog

    Top Five of the Best Dog Kennels for Breeders

    Kennels are the best ways to keep your dog safe and away from your guests. A kennel is also considered as a method to transport dogs to and from the vet. If you ever fly with your dog, you will need a kennel for that as well. The best dog kennels for breeders depends on your dog and your lifestyle. Here are some of the top kennels for breeders that make house training easier.

    Portable Dog Kennels

    These portable dog kennels are typically made from plastic. They generally carry small to medium-sized dogs. They are made from a durable plastic that never collapses. These dog kennels feature a swinging door and a handle on top. These types of kennels are ideal for dogs who are always traveling with their owners. These crates are ideal for car and plane travel. If you are flying with your dog, then you know he will need something durable. This type of kennel will provide him with the most protection.

    Folding Wire Dog Kennels 

    The wire dog kennel is the most common kind. Most of these are folded down, which allow for use inside the house or the car. The benefits to these kennels are that they are easy to clean, and they fit a wide variety of breeds. Your furry friend will have an unlimited view of the house from inside. Placing a thick mat or blanket on the bottom of the kennel will make it more comfortable for your dog. A disadvantage with these kennels is that they are often too big for most dogs that use them. However, a wire kennel may be roomy enough for your dog to do his business on one end and to sleep in his bed on the other end. 

    Soft Dog Kennels 

    These soft dog kennels are made out of canvas and nylon and are more collapsible than plastic or wire kennels. Keep in mind that these kennels are not for every dog. Dogs that love to chew, scratch, or jump around will not be ideal candidates for these soft crates. Dogs that are well-trained and well-behaved will have no problem with these kennels. They are light and portable enough for travel. This makes them a lightweight option for dogs of all sizes. 

    Heavy-Duty Dog Kennels 

    There is not always a need for a heavy-duty dog kennel. This type of dog kennel is generally marketed towards large dogs who tend to destroy or escape from their crates. A heavy-duty dog kennel is also an ideal option for dogs that fear most kennels. These are the types of dogs that chew on the crate and try to escape. This type of kennel is not meant to be used as a prison. If you need the right amount of security to keep your dog inside, then this will provide them the security that he needs. 

    Furniture Grade Dog Kennels 

    These types of kennels are commonly referred to as fashion kennels. It is exactly what you think it is: a kennel … Read More

  • Top 5 Pets to Keep Indoors
    Pet Animals

    Top 5 Pets to Keep Indoors

    Sure, the idea of adopting an indoor pet sounds fun but it is at the same time a critical decision. While the plethora of adorable options leaves no room for homeowners to not be confused, other things that they have to consider to buy an indoor pet is what make the decision all the more difficult.

    It is hard choosing between fur, fins, and wings but to ease the worry a bit, here is a list of top five pets people can consider buying for their home. We have also included all the important factors that need to be accounted for when deciding which animal to keep as a pet. One thing the pet owners should not forget to consider is whether they want their pets to snuggle and cuddle like dogs do or stay in a confined place like the fish stay in water only.

    Here goes the list!

    Dogs

    Unquestionably, dogs are the most popular choice when it comes to owning indoor pets. There is a wide array of dog breeds that adopters get to choose from but what the decision should be backed by are things like the dog breed’s ability to adjust indoors, the size, behaviour, and other factors like the size of family, the presence of kids, etc. Some common breeds that suit most household units include Bichon Frise, Poodle, Maltese, Russian Samoyed, Dachshunds, etc.

    Cats

    Needless to mention though, cats are just as popular as dogs or even more when it comes to buying indoor pets. There are a lot of cat species you can choose from but that will barely make a difference since all of them are more or less equal in size and have the same traits. Again, cats are a very safe choice for indoors!

    Rodents (Guinea Pig and/or Hamsters)

    Rodents are all generally tiny and harmless to humans but it is the guinea pigs and hamsters that rule this category as the most common indoor pets. Guinea pigs and hamsters are two rodents that are commonly available as pets for sale. The former mostly equals the size of small dogs while the latter, as most people must be aware, is really tiny. Nonetheless, they both make for adorable and safe indoor pets. One thing that needs to be considered here is that all rodents need enough space to hop around and exercise.

    Rabbits

    Rabbits, as opposed to how most people perceive them, can be trained to respond to their names, use litter trays, and move on leashes. Rabbits are a strange mix of dogs and cats and make for good indoor pets except that they need more cleaning. The best part is owners can choose from a range of species, colours, and even ear lengths.

    Parrots

    Birds can be just as playful as dogs and parrots particularly are known to be highly responsive and active. There are over 350 types of parrots and literally thousands of colours of parrots that make the decision of buying one really hard. Nonetheless, … Read More

  • Types of Horse Gaits
    Pet Animals

    Types of Horse Gaits

    Horses are beautiful animals. The history of the many different breeds of horses is intertwined with the history of our own human race, as for thousands of years, humans have ridden horses. Horses have carried humans on travels, into battles, in races, and more. Horses are significant because of their ability to travel long distances and at different speeds. And the speed of a horse depends, to a large extent, on its gait.

    What is a horse’s “gait?”

    Essentially, a horse gait is a way that a horse walks or runs. Horses don’t always walk or run in the same way. Depending on which gait it is using, a horse may lift and put down its hooves in a different order, and different sets of hooves may be on the ground or in the air at the same time.

     

    Horses that are easy to ride have distinct gaits at different speeds and can transition between those gaits smoothly. In fact, humans have bred horses in order to achieve these traits. A horse breed that has distinct gaits which can be switched between comfortably while riding is said to a “gaited” breed. Most breeds of horses that you see humans riding around are gaited.

    Types of horse gaits

    Gaited horses generally have four basic gaits. The slowest of the major horse gaits is the walk. This simply means the horse is walking. For horses, walking means moving each leg independently. The hooves each hit the ground at different times, so this gait is said to have four “beats.”

    The next-slowest gait is the trot. In a trot, a horse moves its legs in two pairs. The front right leg is paired with the rear left leg, and the front left leg with the rear right one. The paired legs move together, so the result is a gait with two beats. In the western horse-riding tradition, a trot is also called a jog.

    A little faster than the trot is the canter. The canter is an interesting gait because it has three beats. The horse moves its hind leg first, moves its other hind leg in unison with the opposite foreleg, and then finishes up with the remaining foreleg before repeating the whole process. Western riders sometimes call the canter the “lope.”

    The fastest horse gait is the gallop. A gallop can look a little different depending on how fast the horse is going: at slower speeds, it looks a lot like a canter, but as the horse speeds up a gap grows between the two hoofbeats that happen in unison in a canter. The gallop is a four-beat gait, as opposed to a three-beat one like the canter, and the gap between beats two and three grows as the horse moves faster.

    A word about ambling

    Most horses have the four gaits outlined above, but some have extra ones. An extra four-beat gait that is faster than a walk—and usually, but not always, slower than a canter—is called an … Read More

  • The Stamina and Success Of Dog Training
    Pet Dog

    The Stamina and Success Of Dog Training

    There is one thing for certain in this world: people love their dogs. Dogs have a special place in our hearts and our homes. They can be a companion for someone who is lonely or a playmate to a busy family with children. They are loyal and true; a friend when you need a friend. However, sometimes their bad habits get in the way of us seeing their cute personalities. This is when some training might come in handy to help them.

    Potty Training

    One of the most common concerns about training your dog always seems to revolve around “potty training”. Learning a schedule and sticking with it is one the most effective key components when training your dog to use the potty outside a bit quicker. The consistency encourages muscle memory which is something very similar to how children learn to use the potty.

    Your positive energy plays a huge role. Like most people, it’s annoying or frustrating cleaning one mess after the other, so the more positive energy you project the better results you should get. No different from a child, frequent potty usage will be on an all-time high in the beginning. This is why the important field of energy needs to be established when associating the outdoors with potty usage.

    We joyfully praise our children for perfect potty usage, but even if there are quite a few unfortunate or unexpected messes, we never change our energy to a negative feel. This might discourage your child from using potty alone or communicating to you they need to make a trip to the potty. Surprisingly some of the same rules apply to your new, cute, and adorable puppy.

    Obedience Lessons

    Can you recall every lesson learned from each teacher you have endured through high school or college? If you said no, me either. There’s always that one teacher or professor that intrigued your sensibilities towards learning. The same perspective of jogging your memory can apply to most growing puppies. It’s usually better to designate one teacher for your puppy’s learning skills. Inadequate training from other family members can offset everything you are trying to teach your pup.

    One of the hardest situations to implement adequate training behaviors from the entire family arises during dinner time. Everybody always seems to fall for that cute innocent whimper for scrapes off your plate. This very moment is the best time to stand firm on habitats your training your pup to avoid. This will help establish that begging doesn’t get him or her anywhere.

    Paying close attention to body language can be the icebreaker in most pet owner relationships. All pet personalities aren’t the same. I remember growing up when my sister and I had two different pet dogs of our own. A Pitbull Terrier named “Grits”, and a German Shepherd named “Rocky.” The difference in personality was immediately noticeable. Rocky’s attitude seemed to be more family oriented and loving. He enjoyed playing with all the family members but remained very protective … Read More